John Brett

John is a professional engineer with 50 years experience.

John has designed and built many cars, trucks, and vehicle assembly facilities.

John has worked on design of roads, bridges, cranes, transmission towers, and buildings, and operation, maintenance and upgrade of hydro and gas turbine power stations.

John was a LVV Certifier for 13 years. John has long been a whistle-blower, expressing the view that the LVV system is dangerously deficient. John's authority was revoked in December 2012.

John rides a 1992 Yamaha FJ1200ABS, and is also a keen road and off road cyclist.

APOLOGY

“The LVVTA has brought it to my attention that statements I have made in relation to it and its employees may have been perceived as defamatory.

I sincerely regret that and apologise for any harm caused. I have taken down the statements identified by the LVVTA of concern to it.

I have strong views about the low volume vehicle certification process and intend in the future to direct my energies into the public inquiry now being held in relation to it.”

John Brett 7th October 2015

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Seats and Seatbelts in a Van

Fitting seats and seatbelts to a van requires design to meet the loading requirements in a frontal collision.

Van seatbelts - view from side

Van seatbelts - view from side

The LVV Standards for seats and for seatbelt anchorages set out the different ways of meeting these requirements.

In the Hiace shown, some second-hand seats were to be fitted, these had the seatbelt anchorages in the seat frames, making them “Stressed Seats”. This is much neater than having all the seatbelts going to the floor, however it means that the seat has to be strong enough to take the seatbelt loads.

Van seatbelts  - view from rear

Van seatbelts - view from rear

A quick stress calculation showed that the back beams were not strong enough, and had to be strengthened by adding a 50 x 25 box beam to the original 50 x 50 box beam to make a 50 x 75 box beam.

The mounting system is the “Over-floor mounting bar” system, as in the LVV Standard.

Also visible are headrest mounts on the rear seat back, because of the closeness of the rear window.

Installation by owners Eastern Rentals 66 TeRakau Drive 09 577 0128
Design calculations and LVV Certifification by John Brett Technology Ltd. 0800 LOW VOLUME (0800 569865)

The LVV Standards are here- Seats and seat anchorages [692kB PDF] and here Seatbelts [1024kB PDF]

REAR FACING SEATS
Rear facing seats have to restrain occupants from frontal impact. This means that the seat backs have to be far stronger than normal, or a supporting structure provided.
This is a matter which is often overlooked by some commercial modifiers.

The requirements from ADR VSb 5B are:
Appendix B
Rear-Facing Seat Strength

Rear-facing seats and their anchorages must comply with the requirements of the latest edition of ADR 3/…
In addition, a rear-facing seat should withstand, without imposing any load on any other seat in the vehicle, a load equivalent to twenty times the weight of the seat and its occupants applied in the forward direction relative to the vehicle. Seats intended to accommodate more than one occupant should withstand the loads applied by all occupants simultaneously. This requirement should be demonstrated with the occupant load uniformly distributed over the backrest and head restraint of the seat.
The occupant mass to be used to determine the test loads for each category of seat must be:
Category 1 – 68 kgs
Category 2 – 38 kgs
Category 3 – 26 kgs.

Reasearch link:-
[DOC]
COMMERCIAL MANUFACTURE AND INSTALLATION OF ADDITIONAL SEATS
– 8:15am
File Format: Microsoft Word – View as HTML
Rear-Facing Seat Strength. Rear-facing seats and their anchorages must comply with the requirements of the latest edition of ADR 3/. …
www.infrastructure.gov.au/roads/vehicle…/bulletin/…/vsb_05_b.doc

159 comments to Seats and Seatbelts in a Van

  • johnbrett

    It would be a lot easier to buy a van with the seats and belts already installed. The Ford transit seats with integral belts mount to substantial underfloor structures, are excellent, and far better than anything you could have installed aftermarket. Sorry to be directing you away from LVV Certification, however this will be the most efficient path for you. Regards John

  • Rob Judd

    “Vans do not need rear seatbelts if built before March 2002.” Are you serious? My 1982 Toyota Lite Ace LXV just failed WoF because the centre rear row only had belts in the rear-facing direction. The inspector made an error – it’s registered as a NA (light goods) vehicle) – but if it had been MB class it should definitely have failed.

    See http://vehicleinspection.nzta.govt.nz/virms/in-service-wof-and-cof/general/vehicle-interior/seatbelts-and-seatbelt-anchorages

  • johnbrett

    The table 7.5.1 in the VIRM shows what seatbelt types are required.
    See: http://vehicleinspection.nzta.govt.nz/virms/in-service-wof-and-cof/general/vehicle-interior/seatbelts-and-seatbelt-anchorages
    If your vehicle is registered as an NA Class, it should not have more than two rows of seats (that is, front row, and one rear row.)
    As such, it does not need seatbelts in Row 2
    If it is an MB, then it needs complying seatbelts for all rear seating positions.
    If seating positions have been added, then it should have LVV Certification.
    I recommend discussing this with your WOF inspector, asking him to clarify his decision to you.
    I would discuss this with the WOF inspector

  • Dave Alexander

    I have recently purchased a 1966 swb land rover station wagon.
    The land rover states it is a 7 seater 3 in the front and 2 on each side facing bench seat (4 in the back)
    However carjam sez it is a 5 seater ….. can I legally take seven as per manufacturers specs, and what would happen if I was pulled up by police.

    Regarding seat belts I believe it currently requires seat belts only for driver and outer front passenger not the middle front passenger or the rear side facing seats.

    “Now the plot thickens” … my family consists 2 adults and 2 pre-school children, what are the legal requirements for transporting my family … I assume that at least one child would be required to be in a car seat in the front outer passenger seat position, unsure of second car seat in front middle seat if lap belt existed? … the other adult unrestrained in the back seat.???

    Now I could put in rear forward facing seats, either aftermarket seats designed to meet uk MOT/EU standards and fit the lap shoulder belts after fitting designed strengthening brackets for the shoulder mount.
    Or indeed fit rear forward mounting seats (possibly folding such as in the rear of a toyota town ace).

    Am I right in assuming these new rear seats would need LV cert and any rear seat belts as well?

    After this new LV cert was issued could I then remove the modified seats at a later date, and legally carry passengers in the original factory side facing seats again.

    To be honest I’m tempted to do this work in a safe professional manor (using appropriate reinforcing plates and brackets) and simply removing it at WOF time, and not worry about certification, a bit of paper dosnt make it safe, and anything be better than the existing setup, and no im not changing vehicles.1

  • johnbrett

    Hi Dave
    The legal requirements are in the VIRM- here is the page for seatbelts: http://vehicleinspection.nzta.govt.nz/virms/in-service-wof-and-cof/general/vehicle-interior/seatbelts-and-seatbelt-anchorages
    Yo will see that rear seat-belts are not required, but a centre lap belt is.
    I cannot explain why Landata shows only five seats, not seven- that’s a matter you would have to take up with NZTA, say starting with a TSD agent such as VTNZ.
    However, since rear seat-belts are not required, I can’t see it being a legal issue transporting four rear occupants- but remember that unbelted seating positions and side seating positions are very unsafe, and lead to many deaths and injuries.

    If you add seats or seat-belts, Low Volume Vehicle Certification is required.
    The Low Volume Vehicle Certification process is far more than just a piece of paper- the Engineer has to be able to prove that the seats and seat-belts will perform in a 20G collision. If you use stressed seats, it is amazing the strength that needs to be added- just some reinforcing plates under the floor won’t work. The people who say that it is not justified, not needed, everyone does this or that- are not going to be there when the meat hits the metal!
    I cannot advise you what to do, or to act outside the law- however it is getting hard to find a good LVV Certifier these days.
    Best wishes- John

  • Teddy THOMPSON

    Hello
    i have a 1997 Toyota Hiace with fold up 3 seat in the back. In the front i have a normal seat belt on passenger left and a waste seatbelt in the middle.
    Is it possible to carry 3 kids under the age of 7 in this vehicle and if so under what circumstances. Also if i do not have a car seat can a child under the age of 7
    sit in the back of this vehicle?

  • johnbrett

    Hi Teddy
    The seatbelts in your vehicle appear correct for the age of the vehicle. Row 1 has retractable lap and diagonals in the outer positions, and lap belt in the centre position. Row 2 is not required to have seatbelts. I am not qualified to comment on the ROAD CODE- check http://www.nzta.govt.nz/resources/roadcode/about-driver-responsibility/safety-belts-and-child-restraints.html It says “Responsibility

    As the driver you are responsible for making sure passengers under the age of 15 are using an approved child restraint or safety belt.

    Children under seven must be correctly secured in an approved child restraint.
    Children aged seven must use an approved child restraint if one is available. If such a restraint is not available, the child must be restrained as securely as practicable in the circumstances using any child restraint or seat belt that is available (whether or not that child restraint or seat belt is approved).
    Children aged eight to 14 must wear a safety belt.

    The safety belt must be worn correctly and kept securely fastened while the vehicle is in motion on the road.

    Passengers 15 years and over are responsible for making sure that they wear their own safety belts correctly and that they keep them fastened while the vehicle is in motion.

    So by my reading, you would not be allowed to carry more than one child in this vehicle

    I suggest that you get rear seatbelts fitted

    Regards

    John

  • Xiang

    Hi John, I have a 2004 8 seater Estima with three lap belts for the middle row three seats and they are the same feature: you can pull them out completely dose not matter how fast you pull(not locking).There are also two three points safe belts for the side seats. I had a research and it was built like it and someone said it’s feature is that it works when the brake is on but I never tried.See there: http://www.teoc.ws/community/topic/52636-middle-seat-lap-seat-belt-issue-middle-row-of-seats/ . The WOF man said it should not be like that. My question is if the belt was built with that feature then should it pass the WOF check or not? Thanks.

  • johnbrett

    Hi Xiang
    The rules for WOF are here: http://vehicleinspection.nzta.govt.nz/virms/in-service-wof-and-cof/general/vehicle-interior/seatbelts-and-seatbelt-anchorages
    The belts you describe sound as if they are “single sensitive”, and lock only in frontal impact. They are allowed if fitted from standard. Ask your WOF man to read section 7.5.3 of the VIRM
    Hope this helps

    John

  • Xiang

    Thanks John. Where should I find that the lap belts are “single sensitive”? I have tried searching online for hours but could not get any information about it. I have to convince the WOF man to believe that the belts were built as that. Regards.

  • johnbrett

    Hi Xiang
    There should be a standards marking tag sewn on the belt, usually at the floor mounting. It will give Japanese standards, date of manufacture and the symbol V, or W, or VW for the type. V is ‘Vehicle sensitive, which is what you have, W is sensitive to belt weight, VW is both.
    If you look at the table 7.5.3 in the VIRM, the requirement is for L1 which means single sensitive belts in those positions. Your WOF man should know this
    Good luck

    John

  • Xiang

    Thanks John, I just checked that the lap belts have words: MEETS JIS D4604, Ⅱ,ELR-V and the three point belt has VWe at the end. Will show this to the WOF man. Very appreciate your help.

  • Anthony

    Hi John
    I wonder if you can assist me. I am keen to buy a second hand Toyota Hiace campervan (trademe listing: http://www.trademe.co.nz/Browse/Listing.aspx?id=906808605). I need for it to have certified seatbelts a the back because I will need to install a baby car seat on these rear seats.
    The vehicle currently have seatbelts fitted at the back, but the current owner told me that he failed WOF last time as these were not certified. If I were to buy this van, can you please explain to me what would be the process to follow to get the existing seatbelts certified? Is it doable at all? Any idea of what cost it would involve? Cheers. Anthony

  • johnbrett

    Hi Anthony- I looked at the Trademe ad- and I recognize that type of Japanese installation. The issue is that the rear seat-belt mounts do not meet the required standard, and will not take the required loadings. In vehicles I inspected, these belts were removed. The WOF inspector is correct in failing the vehicle for having un-certified rear seat-belts. Unfortunately it is not easy to bring them up to standard, as the seat belt mounts are on a swiveling, tilting base that does not have the required strength. I am no longer doing LVV Certs, and the LVV system has become so dysfunctional that I cannot recommend any way to add certified rear seat-belts to this vehicle. Sorry, John

  • Anthony

    Thanks for taking the time to post a reply John. This is much appreciated.
    I am going to see another van tomorrow with rear seat belts installed: http://www.trademe.co.nz/Browse/Listing.aspx?id=910994880
    How can I make sure that the seat belts at the back are certified? Is there an indication of it somewhere in the van? is the paperwork maybe? Thanks again John.

  • johnbrett

    If the seats and seatbelts are Certified, there should be a LVV Cert plate on the vehicle. The usual place would be under the engine hatch. Good luck!

  • Jamie

    Hi John,

    We are thinking of buying a Mitsubishi Delica Starwagon or L300 and taking all the rear seats out for a camper conversion but we would like to be able to install a baby seat near the front, ideally between the two front seats. Do you know whether this would be possible and how difficult / costly it is?

    Thanks
    Jamie

  • johnbrett

    Hi- I think you will be able to install a baby seat in the centre-front position, using the existing lap seatbelt, and adding an upper tether point using the “Station wagon” kit which adds an angled strap down to a special anchor point fitted to the floor of the van. This will NOT need any Certification, and can be installed by any approved installer. If you are in Auckland I would refer you to a seatbelt installer, but probably any mechanic could install the kit. Check this website- http://www.childrestraints.co.nz/toptether.php Hope this helps.

  • jon

    hi John, I have a 1984 fj45 single cab landcruiser that has been fitted with a fiberglass cab and I need to get certified seat belts, a roll hoop has been turned down by lvvta and I have been advised to consider fitting two fully stressed seats, can you recommend what underfloor steel work would be needed to support stressed seats or who could design it for me, I am in Wanganui, regards jon

  • johnbrett

    Hi Jon It’s hard to know what to advise. I would have thought that a roll-bar with the upper seat-belt anchorage would have been the best answer- it would need to be a hoop with a brace each side- perhaps there is no room for the braces inside the cab, maybe that’s the LVVTA’s problem. I have seen Landrovers fitted with an EXTERNAL roll cage- perhaps that’s an option, with seat-belt anchorages mounted to that. A stressed seat is not so easy to find- some later model 2 door cars have them, but good luck finding them at wreckers yards. The older 2 door Range-Rover also had stressed seats- you might find them at a specialized wrecker. Mountings- you need to withstand uplift of at least 2 tons at the rear mountings, so they can’t be just attached to the floor or the existing mounts. You would need a new cross-member designed for the job (either inside the floor, or underneath) bolted to the chassis. Who is your Low Volume vehicle Certifier? what does he say? Regards John

  • Clayton

    Hi, I have a 2001 Toyota Estima. We now have 7 kids though so are one seat short. Is there any way a bench seat or 2nd row estima 2 seat can be fitted to the front making it a 9 seater? Thanks.

  • johnbrett

    Hi Clayton
    You need a center seat in the front row? For the center position you need a lap seat belt, which you could use with a child seat tether on the rear floor. You could use this then with a child seat, or with a child harness. To add the seating position, probably work with an upholsterer to build a narrow seat attached to the floor (maybe piggy-backing onto existing seat mounts). This is NOT an ideal option for safety- because Child seats are not recommended in Row 1 (front row), the dash bulge is a hazard to the passenger, and you are cramping the drivers elbow space. You will need Low Volume Vehicle Certification, and I cannot think who to recommend at this time. It might be a better option to look for a 10 seater vehicle if you can. I believe that Ssang-Yong have a 10 seater version of their Stavic model.
    Best wishes- John

  • AllyKidd

    Hi John.

    I have a problem with the wof for my 96 HiAce with rear foldong seat that Ive owned for 10 years.

    The garage said the law has changed and it is now based on the class of the vehicle and weight. they said miune is either class MA, MB, or NA.

    They then said something about unladen weight, and allowing 65kg for each seat and the laden weight…

    Do you know if there has been a law change, and have a link to the citeria that exempts it from seatbelts? On the link you posted above I cant see where it refers to rear folding seats, just rear facing.

    I appreciate your help with this.

  • johnbrett

    Hi

    I am not aware of any change in the law
    This link goes to to the relevant page in the VIRM showing the requirements- http://vehicleinspection.nzta.govt.nz/virms/in-service-wof-and-cof/general/vehicle-interior/seatbelts-and-seatbelt-anchorages\

    Go to Table 7-5-2 Types of seatbelts

    No seatbelt is required for the folding rear seat in this vehicle- I suggest you refer your WOF agent to this page.

    Regards

    John

  • AllyKidd

    Thanks for your reply. perhaps I am reading the table wrong? I can see that vehicles First registered anywhere: 1/1/1961–31/3/2002
    Rear outer –R2 or R1 or S1
    Rear middle –L or S or R1 or R2

    What am I missing? Apparently the maunfacture class of the van is “passenger” which I find odd as it is the 5 door DX model. I beleived this was a light cargo vehicle but have been told its not.
    I couldnt see anything in the table relating directly to the “fold-up seat”.

    Thanks again for your help with this John.

  • Amanda WILLS

    Hello cant seem to find answers to my questions… We have a nissain caravan 1998 with 9 rear seats with lap only belts.. We want to put in shoulder\lap belts…
    We r looking at seats that come out of a Nissan carvan homy 2007 module.. That have set belts including but not attached to seats.. Can we use these also who do we have to get to installe them and certificate seat belts.. As they will need to be put into van and attached to van… We want to rearrange the positions of seats as well.. Not jsut a straight out replace

  • johnbrett

    Hi Amanda- for your vehicle, lap belts were the requirement at the time. If you want to change the layout of the seats you will need a specialist installer who can mount the seats, seat-belts, and will arrange Certification. I can suggest Jackson Enterprises, and Autotransform.

    Hope this helps

    Regards

    John

  • dan

    Hi John,

    I have a 1993 long wheel base toyota hiace 4wd. I bought it second hand and it is registered as a three seater. What are the legal steps require for set this up with a rear seat and seat belts? If its possible at all? it has factory mounting thread in the rear floor and also unused thread nuts mounted under the floor..?

    Cheers

    Dan

  • johnbrett

    Hi Dan- I have done many vans like this.
    According to the VIRM, if you can find a seat that will bolt to the original seat mountings, you would not need a Low Volume Vehicle Certification. The words are-

    “LVV Certification is NOT required if:

    the seat is either an unmodified OE seat from another vehicle or of a known and reputable aftermarket brand, and

    – the seat is fitted to unmodified OE seat anchorages, and

    – the seatbelt anchorage or operation is not affected, and

    – the seat components (including brackets, runners and rails) are compatible with each other, ie they are either OE components from a production vehicle or of a known and reputable aftermarket brand, and are not fitted together by welding, and

    – the relationship between seat, seat occupant, front airbag and location of the seatbelt anchorages is not affected.

    Note LVV certification is not required where the only modification is the removal of seats and/or seatbelts. However, a class change and a new load rating may be required in some cases.”

    Also, you are not required to fit seat-belts to that rear seat for your vehicle.

    URL is- http://vehicleinspection.nzta.govt.nz/virms/in-service-wof-and-cof/general/vehicle-interior/seats-and-seat-anchorages

    Other than that, you WILL need Low Volume Vehicle Certification. I would recommend that you hunt for a matching seat, and then talk to a firm such as Seatbelt Specialities Ltd about supplying and fitting the belts.

    Regards

    John

  • Caro

    Hi John

    We have purchased a 1995 Toyota Hiace 4 wheel assist Campervan, with a three seat front cabin (2x 3 point and one lap belt) plus 5 lap belts in rear (1x 2 seat folding bed, 1x 2seat box seat and 1x box seat)

    We asked for 3point belts to be fitted to the folding seat and one on rear box seat.
    They have installed them but the anchorage points for fixing the belts are very long and aren’t anchored in the middle of the seat as per usual. They have fixed anchor points beneath the seats on the left and right side of the seating unit.
    This looks wrong to me, they are insisting that it will comply with an MOT inspection but I am very concerned. My question is, do we need 3 point seat belts by law in this van to pass an MOT.
    We have two sons age 10 and 13 both are taller than the 135cm height ruling for car seats to apply, are they able to travel legally using the lap belts supplied with the Campervan?
    Obviously I would prefer them to have 3 point seat belts and would greatly appreciate any advice you can offer.

  • johnbrett

    Hi Caro- If you have had seatbelts fitted, I would assume that they were Low Volume Vehicle Certified. There should be a Certification plate riveted to the vehicle, usually under the engine hatch. Any WOF inspector will look for the Certification plate- if he cannot find one he will fail the vehicle. (WOF inspectors do NOT approve seat-belt installations themselves).
    If you have any issues with the seat-belt Installation you need to take it up with the LVV Certifier, or if you cannot identify who it was, with the Low Volume Vehicle Technical Association.
    I cannot see your vehicle, but I have LVV Certified many seat-belt installations in similar vehicles. My experience is that it is great if seat-belts can be mounted to the seats directly, however the seats have to be designed for this, and have the required strength for the huge loads applied. In 1995 vehicles, the folding seats were very far from being suitable, which is probably why the belts are mounted to the floor. The centre belt will be a lap belt because that is all that is required, because there is usually no suitable structure for the upper mount.
    For a 1995 van, rear seat-belts are not mandatory, but if fitted must be worn.
    That is all I can say without any more information. If you email me photos, john@lowvolumevehicle.co.nz I may be able to say more.
    Please consider my “Give a Little” campaign for my legal costs for pointing out the dangers of the Low Volume Vehicle system.
    Thanks John

  • zane pilkington

    hi John
    I have a 2011 toyota hiace import and have purchased a toyota rear seat complete with all seat belts bolts etc that was removed from a 2012 nz new toyota hiace.
    The area that I would assume that the seatbelts could be mounted are non existent on my 2011 van what is the best option for retrofitting can you recommend a company??

  • johnbrett

    Hi Zane
    I never cease to be amazed at the minor differences in what look like identical Toyota Hiace Vans! You need to have Seatbelt Anchorages installed and Certified. If you are in Auckland, I suggest Seatbelt Specialists in Glenfield, or Autobelts in Penrose. Both know the drill, and will have a Low Volume Vehicle Certifier available.
    Cheers

    John

  • Tony

    Hi, my courier xtracab ute only has 2 rear belts, can I add a centre lap belt using the mount points from the outside belts?

  • johnbrett

    Hi Tony

    No, sorry, you can’t use the existing mounts to add an extra belt. The existing mounts cannot be proven to be strong enough for an extra seatbelt loading. To add another seatbelt you willl need to have new mounts added, and LVV Certified.

    Cheers

    John

  • Dan

    Hi,

    I’m just wondering how strict the regulations around seating are. I understand the seatbelt regulations, but if I were to remove the factory seating and replace it with something more custom (keeping the seatbelts in place) would this be legal, provided the new seating was bolted down properly and everything?

  • Arnie

    Morning I have a CF Bedford and what to install a bench seat behind drivers (row 2) can it be done? and do I need seat belts?

  • johnbrett

    Good morning Arnie
    Yes, you can install a rear seat.
    It will not need seatbelts, for the age of the vehicle, however there is nothing to stop you having seat belts fitted
    The seat installation, and any seat belt installation will need to be LVV Certified, so talk to a LVV Certifier before starting
    This is a link to the WOF guide
    http://vehicleinspection.nzta.govt.nz/virms/in-service-wof-and-cof/general/vehicle-interior/seats-and-seat-anchorages

    Regards

    John

  • Peter McGuire

    John I have a 1996 Nissan Homy VX first reg in NZ 2006, I have just purchased it and notice that there are no seatbelts in the rear, there is one row of rear seats. It has been passing wof checks ok,,but before I try my wof guy do you think this vehicle should have rear belts.

  • johnbrett

    Hi Peter

    For the year of manufacture, 1996, rear seat-belts are not required
    See http://vehicleinspection.nzta.govt.nz/virms/in-service-wof-and-cof/general/vehicle-interior/seatbelts-and-seatbelt-anchorages
    Your WOF agent will (or should) be aware of this.
    I would recommend that you have seatbelts fitted in the rear, LVV Certification will be required.

    Regards

    John

  • Katharine Davis

    Hi John. We have a 2010 vw T5 conversion. It has an uncertified rear bed seat which we would like to replace with an M1 pull tested rock and roll bed from the UK. These beds are uk mot compliant and ce certified. Can they be fitted and certified in Nz? I’m assuming an lvv certification is required. Any recommendations for south auckland?

  • johnbrett

    Hi Katherine
    Thank you for your query. LVV Certification is ONLY required if seat-belts are involved. Seat-belts WILL be required for seats that are used for carrying passengers when traveling. However, in Motor-homes and caravans, some seats can be regarded as part of the caravan function, intended for use when stationary. Presumably, your vehicle has the required number of seats with seat-belts already, which is one seat for each sleeping berth.
    So- you could change this bed as you describe, without any need for Certification, so long as it is for use whilst the vehicle is stationery.

    Hope this helps

    Regards

    John

  • Katharine Davis

    John. We are wanting to use the seats as travelling seats. The seat-bed would have engineering certification from the uk. Is it likely that this certification would be acceptable in nz? Do you know of anyone we could talk to about this?

  • johnbrett

    Hi Katherine
    UK Certification should be OK for a NZ LVV Certifier, so long as it covered the right things- e.g. seat-belt anchorages, or use as a rear facing seat.
    Mounting in the vehicle needs to be Engineered locally, and there are lvv sTANDARDS FOR THIS.
    You do need to find a LVV Certifier with the right categories, and there’s no-one left I can recommend now. I suggest that you ask NZTA to locate a suitable LVV Certifier for you.

    Regards

    John

  • Rachel

    We have a 2000 Toyota Estima 7 seater. Do we need a Cert to change it to an 8 seater??

  • johnbrett

    Hi Rachel
    The answer is YES you will need a Cert. Sometimes the change is easy, bolt in, bolt out, but sometimes additional seat mountings, or seat-belt anchorages are required. Either way, the Certifier gets to see what is there, and make his decision.

    Thanks for your query.

  • carl

    Hi I have a 2001 Toyota Hiace 3seater and am wanting to add another 2 or 3 seats in the back,would it need cert if the extra seats are from a 1998 toyota granvia van?

  • johnbrett

    Hi Carl- Yes- it would need a Cert- even if the mounting holes for the seats and belts are in the Hiace.
    Before you install anything, get talking to a Certifier, or a firm that has a certifier on hand, so that the work is done to standard.

    There is no charge for this free advice, but could I ask that you make a small donation to my ‘Give-a Little’ campaign? This is to cover legal costs for defending myself from Defamation charges made by Mr Johnson of the LVVTA.
    If you did want to, just click though to the Give-a Little page.

    Cheers

    John

    John

  • BrettW

    Hi John,

    I’m looking to purchase a 2008 Nissan Caravan which I intend to use as a camper. I need the rear seats to legally carry 2 kids. Most vans I’m seeing for sale have a fold up rear seat with no seat belts. Is it possible to get legal seat belts installed in these vans. Here’s a link to the type of van I’m considering: http://www.trademe.co.nz/Browse/Listing.aspx?id=1304990144

    Many thanks,
    Brett

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